DUKKI SHOWCASE 2015 – Introducing Tom Marshall of Photogra-Fix

Tom Marshall is a photo colouriser, based in Glasgow, but originally from the East Midlands. He uses digital techniques to transform black and white photos into full colour works of art which bring history back to life.

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This year has flown by, and it’s now time to introduce Tom Marshall from PhotograFix, who will be exhibiting ‘Nottingham’s Past in Colour’ here at DUKKI from 17th June to 5th July.

Tom Marshall is a photo colouriser, based in Glasgow, but originally from the East Midlands.  He uses digital techniques to transform black and white photos into full colour works of art which bring history back to life.  The colours used for each image are researched to the fullest extent possible and often many days of work go into completing each picture.

Drury Hill 8x12 Info Card 5

We are particularly excited about having Tom to exhibit with us this month, as he is                                             brother to Heidi, owner of Dukki.                                                    Heidi says “Growing up with Tom, it was easy to see that his career path would take him down a creative route. After making countless short special effects films, and later studying Media at the university of Lincoln, Tom became more and more interested in photography and old photographs in particular, which is where PhotograFix was born. I’m delighted to have him exhibiting at our shop!”

Boys Playing 8x12

Tom has a great love of the history of Nottingham and the surrounding area, with a particular interest in the architecture that has long since disappeared.

Garage 8x12 Info Card 1

 Tom has had the pleasure of colourising historical photographs for the Open University, the British Army, the National Museum of Ireland and the Welsh Guard, alongside commissions for private clients. 

Below, a  group of Irish soldiers recuperating with nurses c1917. Pictured are two different nursing organisations, the Territorial Force Nursing Service (TFNS) and the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service (QAIMNS). The TFNS wore a blue grey cape with a scarlet trim, and just visible on the uniforms of the nurses to the left of the image is a small silver ‘T’ which defines them as such. This Image was colourised as part of a recent exhibition for the National Museum of Ireland and a link to the exhibition can be found here 

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Toms offers a full restoration service, and colourising starts from £25.

 To See more of Tom’s work at www.photogra-fix.com or at www.facebook.com/PhotograFixUK

It’s a bleddeh cob, Duck!

Or is it?

Have you had this discussion before?

It’s a great debate that has caused controversy for years, and continues to do so to this day.
If you come from Nottingham, bread rolls are called  ‘Cobs.’ I grew up on the Rutland/ Leicestershire border and they were definitely always called cobs there ; yet travel to Merseyside and it’s a ‘Nudger’ and in parts of Scotland they’re ‘bannocks’ or ‘butteries’.

To most people, a cob is either a female horse, or an ancient building material, made with straw and clay. But in Nottingham, its a thing you ask yer mam ter get yer frum th bakereh!

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On the other hand, if yer Nanar’s gorra cob on, then it means she’s probably in a bad mood…

The name for a bread roll varies depending on where you travel in the UK, and that one word can be key to people telling where you’re from in an instant. I always remember visiting friends in Lancashire, and being offered a ‘teacake’ to put my chips in; being too polite to say no, I was wondering whether it would have currants in! Disappointingly, it was just a cob (sorry, bread roll!)

If you go daan saaf, and ask for a sausage roll, it’s quite likely that you’ll be given a roll with a couple of sausages in, and perhaps a bit of red sauce. If you ask for a sausage roll in the East Midlands, you’ll be presented with the pastry variety! This begs the question, what do they call sausage rolls in the south of England? It’s too bleddeh confusing!

Anyway, if you’d like to join the debate, please feel free to share this post, and comment on what you call this bready lump of carbohydrates!

Next time you’re in a bakery, in unfamiliar territories, it’s probably best to just point at what you want and ask for “one of those”.

If you want any of our #itsacob products, you can visit our shop in the Broadmarsh Shopping Centre, or visit www.dukkigifts.co.uk

Continue reading “It’s a bleddeh cob, Duck!”