DUKKISHOWCASE2015 – Introducing Burning Sensations Pyrography

Liz has been a pyrography Artist for 17 years. She concentrates mainly on cartoon and tattoo style art, hand burning pictures and words onto wooden items, like keepsake boxes, plaques and bookmarks.

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Good Morning everybody! It’s time to introduce the forthcoming exhibition we are having here at DUKKI. The next bogger to come and exhibit is Liz from

                                      Burning Sensations Pyrography                                          17-31 July 2015

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Liz has been a pyrography Artist for 17 years. She concentrates mainly on cartoon and tattoo style art, hand burning pictures and words onto wooden items, like keepsake boxes, plaques and bookmarks.

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She also carries out commissions in a variety of different styles, providing personalised unique gifts.

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Burning Sensations Pyrography is based in Gedling, Nottinghamshire and you will also find them at various craft stalls, festivals, tattoo conventions and comic conventions. They cover a wide range of steam-punk/alternative fairs all over the UK, selling their burnt wooden offerings; in fact, you can find them tomorrow at Dubdayz Summerfest tomorrow 11th July.

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you can follow Burning Sensations Pyrography on Facebook by clicking here

Come down and show your support for her creations from 17 July, DUKKI, Upper level, Broadmarsh Shopping Centre, Nottingham, NG1 7LN

DUKKI SHOWCASE 2015 – Introducing Tom Marshall of Photogra-Fix

Tom Marshall is a photo colouriser, based in Glasgow, but originally from the East Midlands. He uses digital techniques to transform black and white photos into full colour works of art which bring history back to life.

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This year has flown by, and it’s now time to introduce Tom Marshall from PhotograFix, who will be exhibiting ‘Nottingham’s Past in Colour’ here at DUKKI from 17th June to 5th July.

Tom Marshall is a photo colouriser, based in Glasgow, but originally from the East Midlands.  He uses digital techniques to transform black and white photos into full colour works of art which bring history back to life.  The colours used for each image are researched to the fullest extent possible and often many days of work go into completing each picture.

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We are particularly excited about having Tom to exhibit with us this month, as he is                                             brother to Heidi, owner of Dukki.                                                    Heidi says “Growing up with Tom, it was easy to see that his career path would take him down a creative route. After making countless short special effects films, and later studying Media at the university of Lincoln, Tom became more and more interested in photography and old photographs in particular, which is where PhotograFix was born. I’m delighted to have him exhibiting at our shop!”

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Tom has a great love of the history of Nottingham and the surrounding area, with a particular interest in the architecture that has long since disappeared.

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 Tom has had the pleasure of colourising historical photographs for the Open University, the British Army, the National Museum of Ireland and the Welsh Guard, alongside commissions for private clients. 

Below, a  group of Irish soldiers recuperating with nurses c1917. Pictured are two different nursing organisations, the Territorial Force Nursing Service (TFNS) and the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service (QAIMNS). The TFNS wore a blue grey cape with a scarlet trim, and just visible on the uniforms of the nurses to the left of the image is a small silver ‘T’ which defines them as such. This Image was colourised as part of a recent exhibition for the National Museum of Ireland and a link to the exhibition can be found here 

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Toms offers a full restoration service, and colourising starts from £25.

 To See more of Tom’s work at www.photogra-fix.com or at www.facebook.com/PhotograFixUK

Bea Roberts is now at DUKKI

Bea Roberts – Contemporary Folk Art is now exhibiting at DUKKI!

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Pop down to see her ‘Quirky Owl’ ‘Weird Fish’ and ‘Green eye cat’ amongst other pieces

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There is a vast selection of greetings cards, stickers,

jewellery and original pieces too!

You can read more about Bea by clicking here

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Come and see, me duck! It’s well worth a look!

#DUKKISHOWCASE2015

DUKKI Showcase 2015 – Introducing Bea Roberts Contemporary Folk Art

Her paintings are a playful, schizophrenic merging of techniques and ideas and she works in mixed media , creating artwork which has a rough, primitive naivety.

Another month has sailed by and in this merry month, we would like to introduce

Bea Roberts, who will be exhibiting with us from 17th – 31st May bea roberts

Bea has been painting and drawing more or less all of her life, and had her first exhibition at the age of 14. Her paintings are a playful, schizophrenic merging of techniques and ideas and she works in mixed media , creating artwork which has a rough, primitive naivety.

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Working intuitively and spontaneously, she uses collagraph printing techniques, brushes, sticks and other implements, as well as collage to create her vigorous and slightly surreal artworks. Her work is sold via the internet, in exhibitions and from her studio.

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She has participated in group shows, solo shows and juried exhibitions, and her work hangs in private collections all over the world. Some of her work has also been used in several film and TV productions, including Channels 4’s Cucumber, the new feature film ‘The Ninth Life of Louis Drax’ and a new German TV Drama, which is being filmed in Manchester.

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Her work is predominantly figurative. She is infinitely fascinated by faces, bodies and people. This fascination is apparent in some of the more surreal creatures she creates as well

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Bea’s exhibition opens on 17th May for two weeks. She is also a regular writer for Creative Nottingham and you can also follow her blog here

Her website is www.bearoberts.co.uk 

Thank duck its Friday! I need your Help

Dukki

Ay up fellow Dukkies. I need your help. 

I had just opened the shop this morning, and was putting the kettle on for the first cuppa of the day, when a woman entered the shop. I said my usual hello as I always do to new customers, and carried on setting up the shop.

I thought she was just avin a ‘goz’ at what I was selling, so I left her to it. but clearly, she had another agenda. She came up to the counter and asked me who did all the artwork. I went into my usual spiel, that we’re an independent gift shop, and that I produce all the local dialect stuff and my partner Ian paints all the Local Landmarks.

Then she said “so why this?” and pointed to this frame

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“this isn’t Nottingham” she said (she was right) “why are you encouraging swear words in your…

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Thank duck its Friday! I need your Help

In a word where we fight for freedom of speech, has it now become inappropriate to use the word duck?

Ay up fellow Dukkies. I need your help. 

I had just opened the shop this morning, and was putting the kettle on for the first cuppa of the day, when a woman entered the shop. I said my usual hello as I always do to new customers, and carried on setting up the shop.

I thought she was just avin a ‘goz’ at what I was selling, so I left her to it. but clearly, she had another agenda. She came up to the counter and asked me who did all the artwork. I went into my usual spiel, that we’re an independent gift shop, and that I produce all the local dialect stuff and my partner Ian paints all the Local Landmarks.

Then she said “so why this?” and pointed to this frame

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“this isn’t Nottingham” she said (she was right) “why are you encouraging swear words in your shop? Everything else is great in the shop, but this ruins it” She went on.

I tried to explain that it was a play on words, and that I had created them because we are called DUKKI, and it was supposed to be funny. But she didn’t see the funny side to it.

For those of you that don’t know, I sell a whole range of products replacing the F word for the word duck

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I thanked her for her feedback, and told her she was the first person to have ever complained about these designs. After she’d left, I felt quite upset. I wanted to say “duck you!” But then I stopped and thought about it. Had I just become so desensitised to hearing swear words, that it didn’t offend me anymore?

There are so many things which do offend me in society. Hearing mum’s shouting and swearing at their kids whilst they run riot outside the shop, caring nothing for the people around them having to hear it. Surely that is worse than a picture which uses a word that happens to sound like a swear word?

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We have sold a lot of these pieces, and because they are not strictly Nottingham themed, they appeal to people from all over the country. In fact most of these designs sell on-line, to people outside of Nottingham. They form part of our bread and butter income. Yet, the last thing I want to do is offend anyone. It wasn’t until this lady came in this morning, that I’d ever given it a second thought about it being offensive.

I have always been brought up without swearing, it was totally frowned upon in my upbringing, yet even my mum can see the funny side to these images.

Which begs the question: Should we remove these products? What about ‘Mardy Bum’ and ‘Daft little Bogger’? Are these offensive too?

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In a word where we fight for freedom of speech, has it now become inappropriate to use the word duck?

We sell a lot with ‘Ay up me Duck!’ on, but here the word ‘Duck’ hasn’t been used as a substitute for swearing.

Does anyone actually give a duck?

 Please feel free to share this post, as I’d love to know your thoughts.

TA-RA for now, Duck!

DUKKI Showcase – Introducing Farah Batool Art.

This year is speeding by at a rate of quacks, so I thought it best to introduce our artist for April’s slot in our DUKKI Showcase 2015.

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Farah Batool is a Nottingham based artist, and she often walks in the Peak district of Derbyshire and gets enthused by what she sees. The sense of light, colour and texture that surrounds her, largely inspires the way she works.timthumb (1)

She studied multi-media design at university. During this time she always toyed with the idea of creating artwork and often experimented with ideas using wire, feeling there was something missing from her life. In 2010 she decided to train as a teacher in Art, and around the same time, began to focus on ideas towards becoming a maker in order to utilise her creative skills. She started painting/drawing and working in earnest on canvas with mixed media. It was in 2013 that she started to translate her ideas into ceramic, and fell in love with it.

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Farah is still learning and developing possibilities using ceramic and wire and all the knowledge and techniques she has accumulated over time. Her artwork is inspired by nature and her surroundings, and is lead by a strong sense of design and her fastidious nature to explore ideas, thoroughly creating delicate yet intricate work.

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She predominantly works with bird motifs in white stoneware clay and glass, and is interested in exploring the complex relationship between simple lines and intricate pattern with the depth of tone and subtle texture that is uniquely created through using glass.

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She will be displaying some of her ceramic tiles, and jewellery in her exhibition, including some of her beautiful lace pieces, created using Lace to make an imprint onto porcelain discs. All sets are finished with blue oxide and some have the addition of transparent glaze on the white parts of the pendant to create a contrast with the matt blue

Farah’s exhibition will run from 18- 30 April, and you can follow her on Facebook and Twitter, or to find out more, visit her website www.farahbatool.com